A common childhood disease can cause Neanderthals to become extinct

Ear infections are thought to be responsible for the extinction of this ancient human being by scientists.

Ear infections are thought to be responsible for the extinction of this ancient human being by scientists.

The question mark of the complete disappearance of Neanderthals on Earth, recently, has been answered by scientists. The reason, instead of a past catastrophic catastrophic event, scientists think it could simply be a disease common to children today - ear infections .

Picture 1 of A common childhood disease can cause Neanderthals to become extinct
Replica Neanderthals in the Museum of Natural History, London.(Shutterstock / Chettaprin P).

Today, the disease can easily be treated with modern drugs like antibiotics. However, for ancient Neanderthals, they may have been infected with serious consequences from this ear infection such as: respiratory infections, pneumonia, deafness.

A recent study published in the scientific journal 'The Anatomical Record' found that Neanderthals ' ears are similar to our children's ears, all of which do not change with age.

'This may sound unbelievable but when we first reconstructed the Neanderthal's ear canal structure, we discovered they were very similar to children's ears', said Professor Samuel Marquez, from the University learn Downstate Health Sciences (Newyork) share.

' Middle ear infections are a common problem in young children, because the baby's proboscis are slightly horizontal, so it is easy to build up bacteria that cause ear infections, which is the same thing we found. in Neanderthals'.

Neanderthals were once considered a separate species, having lived in areas that stretched from Siberia in the east to Inberia in the west and from England in the north to Iraq in the south.

Neanderthals first appeared about 450,000 years ago and then gradually became extinct, while our humans began to migrate to the Eurasian continent about 60,000 years ago.

While the shape of our children's ears begins to change at about 5 years of age, it means fewer ear infections. However, research reveals that this does not happen to Neanderthals.

'It is not a matter of death from this infectious disease,' Mr. Marquez added. 'If so, the Neanderthals will no longer be suitable and eligible to compete for survival with their brother - Homo Sapien (scientific name of our modern humanity) on the matter of consciousness. eat and other resources. '

Marquez concluded: 'In a world of survival where only the most suitable candidates exist, it is not surprising that modern humans, rather than Neanderthals, prevail.'