Creating hybrid virus against antibiotic resistant virus

Creating hybrid virus against antibiotic resistant virus : Scientists have combined human cells with bacteria and viruses to create hybrid immune cells, capable of destroying resistant bacteria.

Scientists have combined human cells with bacteria and viruses to create hybrid immune cells, capable of destroying resistant bacteria.

Some viruses have the ability to infect and target specific attacks in a different way than the human immune system. Researchers have used the same mechanism of the virus to transplant it into human immune antibodies. They then do the same with bacteria that attack other bacteria and human antibodies.

Picture 1 of Creating hybrid virus against antibiotic resistant virus

Picture 1 of Creating hybrid virus against antibiotic resistant virus


Scientists hope the hybrids will help eradicate MRSA virus.

In lab experiments, hybrids (lysibodies) that are attached to Staphylococcus bacteria - can become MRSA viruses. They will help signal the immune system to attack and kill bacteria (MRSA stands for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus. This type of bacteria causes staph infection, does not respond. treatment with common antibiotics).

According to the team, testing the technique with mice infected with MRSA showed that their survival rate improved significantly. Human tests are now underway to see how safe and effective these hybrids are.

Professor Vincent Fischetti (Rockefeller University, USA) said: Creating a hybrid with human immune cells will give the body a way to identify completely new disease cells.

"Based on the results, we can use not only lysine, but any molecule that targets certain pathogens - such as viruses, parasites or fungi - to This approach can develop new therapies that enhance immunity to infectious diseases , " Professor Fischetti said.

Human immune antibodies used in hybrids do not attack the disease, but it targets targets for immune cells.

Picture 2 of Creating hybrid virus against antibiotic resistant virus

Picture 2 of Creating hybrid virus against antibiotic resistant virus


Although the path to the release of widely available drugs is long and long, research can help develop new therapies that enhance immunity to infectious diseases.

Dr. Assaf Raz also came from Rockefeller University, who led the research team, saying: "Both antibodies and lysine have a partial association with their target, but while the second component of lysine cuts the membrane. Bacterial cells, antibodies are combined with the immune response, enabling us to mix and combine the virus responsible for carbohydrate lock with part of the antibody directed to the immune cells to do how to react ".

It usually takes years, a new drug to undergo a series of safety and efficacy tests before being used widely. Although there are concerns about potential undesirable consequences from mixing human cells with viruses or bacteria, the study has attracted the attention of the Antibody Research Institute (US).

Partnership between the two sides has been established to accelerate early drug development. Lysibodies has been produced and is planning to test the safety of these hybrids.