Discover how liquid nitrogen destroys everything

When objects freeze due to liquid nitrogen, the particles inside them move much more slowly and the space between the particles almost disappears.

When objects freeze due to liquid nitrogen, the particles inside them move much more slowly and the space between the particles almost disappears. When this is achieved, objects can break when subjected to a sufficiently strong force (such as a sledgehammer).

In the latest installment of the OOO video series, Rose demonstrated what happens to everyday familiar objects when they freeze at extremely low temperatures and each segment is shot slowly with slow-motion effect. .

Nitrogen exists around us. The air you are breathing up to 78 percent is nitrogen. Nitrogen gas can liquefy when it is cooled at -195 degrees celsius. Above this temperature, liquefied nitrogen will boil and return to the original gas. Because it exists at low temperatures and can be poured, liquid nitrogen can be used to freeze any object, but what happens when the objects freeze?

Researchers at the University of Leicester explain: "The dynamical theory of matter can be used to explain how solid, liquid and gas can be interchangeable as a result of When an object is heated, the motion of matter particles increases because matter particles become more energetic, if cooled, the movement of matter particles decreases. because they lose energy ".

Picture 1 of Discover how liquid nitrogen destroys everything
Watermelon fruits break down after freezing in liquid nitrogen solution.(Photo: Wired / Youtube).

In other words, the particles inside the object slow down and the gaps between the particles shrink as the object freezes. And almost all objects become brittle and hard due to this cause.

When objects freeze due to liquid nitrogen, the particles inside them move much more slowly and the space between the particles almost disappears. When this is achieved, objects can break when subjected to a sufficiently strong force (such as a sledgehammer).

With the first experiment, Rose slammed a hammer into a lock at room temperature. Although the dam created a rather large dent inside the lock, the lock was still in normal use. After being soaked in liquid nitrogen solution, the particles inside the lock fit tightly together and will basically stop moving, leaving no space for the dent to exist. Instead it broke.

When doing this experiment with many objects, there are some objects that resist freezing. When Rose dipped a baseball into liquid nitrogen and used a baseball bat to flick it, nothing happened. This is because baseball is made of cork, covered with layers of fabric and covered with outer skin. This structure will make the ball very insulating because a large amount of air is trapped inside.

To break this baseball, you need to soak it long enough in liquid nitrogen so that the air temperature between these layers is leveled. Otherwise, warm air will keep the baseball intact.

Another surprising thing is that liquid nitrogen does not freeze our bodies. In the video, there was a piece of Rose asking a colleague to pour a glass of liquid nitrogen onto his bare back and strangely it didn't leave any trace.

Rose is normal and does not have any freeze on the body. According to the Leidenfrost effect, when a solution comes into contact with an object that is hotter than itself, the solution will instantly transform into a gaseous body, creating a barrier between Rose's back and liquid nitrogen.

However, this will be completely wrong when liquid nitrogen can accumulate anywhere on Rose's body. Because then, the barrier layer collapses and the solution stays on the skin, causing immediate freezing.

What is liquid nitrogen?

Liquid nitrogen is nitrogen in a liquid state at a very low temperature. It is industrially produced by liquid fractional distillation. Liquid nitrogen is a colorless transparent liquid with a specific weight of 0.807 g / ml at its boiling point and a dielectric constant of 1.4. Liquid nitrogen is often referred to as LN2, abbreviated or "LIN" or "LN" and has a UN 1977 number.

Application of liquid nitrogen

  • Liquid nitrogen gas is produced quickly by warming and evaporating liquid nitrogen.
  • It has many applications, including serving as an inert alternative to air when oxidation is undesirable.
  • Pumping automobile and aircraft tires due to its inertness and lack of moisture and oxidation properties, contrary to air.
  • Nitrogen has the effect of slowing down rancidity and other forms of loss caused by oxidation in order to preserve the freshness of packaged or bulk foods, preserving non-oxidized foods with liquefied gas. .
  • Liquid nitrogen gas used in running analyzers, analyzing samples.
  • Liquefied nitrogen gas for cleaning, pipe testing, pipe welding, metallurgy, metal refining, manufacturing of electronic components such as transistors, diodes, and integrated circuits, producing stainless steel. .
  • Liquefied nitrogen gas can replace CO2 to put pressure on some beer containers.
  • Liquid nitrogen is produced on an industrial scale in large quantities by distilling the liquefied air segment and it is often referred to as the false LN2 formula.
  • Nitrogen is also capable of maintaining superheated temperatures, making it extremely useful in many different applications, playing the role of an open cycle refrigerant liquefied gas, including: making cold for transporting food, preserving body parts as well as sperm and egg cells, samples and probiotics. In dermatology liquefied gas to remove ugly malignant skin lesions or carcinogenic potential, for example, warts, lumpy skin calluses etc.
  • Liquefied nitrogen gas can be used as a cooling source to speed CPU, GPU, or other types of hardware.