He discovered the holy well

The Anne wells of Medieval origin have just been found in the grounds of a private farm near Liverpool, England, Seeker reported on November 2.

Saint Anne's well is associated with many medieval legends about the ability to cure skin and eye diseases.

The Anne wells of Medieval origin have just been found in the grounds of a private farm near Liverpool, England, Seeker reported on November 2.

"The well was filled with soil due to plowing activities. There were very few signs of it on the surface when we first came here. However, after excavation, it was found in quite good condition." , Jamine Quartermaine, archaeologist oversees excavation, said.

Picture 1 of He discovered the holy well
The Anne well has just been excavated near Liverpool, England.(Photo: Historic England).

Saint Anne's well is built with locally produced sandstone blocks. It consists of a shallow square tank and two steps leading down.

"The well could be built in the late Middle Ages because of its structure in accordance with the architecture of this period. In addition, Saint Anne only began to be widely worshiped in England in the late 14th century" , Quartermaine to speak.

According to legend, Saint Anne once bathed in this well. Later men, especially in the 19th century, thought that the well could cure eye and skin diseases. Therefore, many pilgrims have come here to soak in a pool of water more than 1m deep.

Another folk legend has it that in the 16th century, a priest in charge of a monastery near the well had let go of a curse that the land dispute with him would die within a year and a day. The other died shortly afterwards, causing many to believe that the well was actually cursed.

Over time, the holy well gradually fell into oblivion and was buried in the cultivation process. After recent excavations, local authorities plan to install new wooden fences around the well to protect it from damage by agricultural machinery.

"We have worked with farmers in the region to ensure this important holy well can last for a long time in the future," Tamsin Cooke, the representative of the British Historical Heritage Foundation was Threatened, said. .