Humans inherit good genes from ancient Neanderthals

The ancient Neanderthal breed has left modern humans (Homo sapien) not only some good genes against disease, but also their allergies.

The ancient Neanderthal breed has left modern humans (Homo sapien) not only some good genes against disease, but also their allergies.

Genetic variations found in modern Neanderthal humans can affect the human immune system, causing excessive reaction to environmental allergens, according to Two new studies were published on January 7 in the Journal of Human Genetics.

"Neanderthals lived in Europe and West Asia about 200,000 years before the emergence of modern humans. They were able to adapt well to the local climate, food and pathogens" - researcher Janet Kelso of the Institute of Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig (Germany) said. "Thanks to the hybridization of Neanderthals with human ancestors, modern humans have gained adaptive abilities."

Picture 1 of Humans inherit good genes from ancient Neanderthals
Neanderthal ancient people simulation image.(Source: livescience).

Studies have found that mating with Neanderthals may have helped ancient humans - people from Africa (human homeland) - get off to a good start in settling down in Europe. Europe . According to this study, mating occurs when the first humans moved from Africa to Europe about 50,000 years ago. The last mating between Neanderthals and humans may have occurred almost 37,000 years ago.

Genetic research also shows that the result of this hybridization is that about 2.5% of European DNA currently originated from Neanderthals, while up to 6% of modern human DNA originated. from other ancient varieties. This group includes both Neanderthals and a mysterious part of the human ancestor who once inhabited Siberia, known as the Denisovans .

Before extinction about 40,000 years ago, the ancient Neanderthals used to live with modern people in Europe for about 5,000 years, long enough to take place in cultural exchanges and breeding.

Previous studies suggest that many genes that modern humans inherit from Neanderthals play a role in the modern human immune system , although it is unclear exactly what this role is.