Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction

Recent reports show that the number of large freshwater animal species has decreased by 97% compared to 1970, due to the natural flow of altered rivers and human catching.

Recent reports show that the number of large freshwater animal species has decreased by 97% compared to 1970, due to the natural flow of altered rivers and human catching.

Picture 1 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction

Picture 1 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction


According to scientists, the Mekong River is home to the largest number of freshwater animal species in the world, but the number of these species has declined sharply because many dams are built upstream, making the natural flow of the river is affected. Giant freshwater stingray is one of these bad animals.At present, it is not possible to quantify the number of these species in the wild because they live close to the mud layer in the river bed.(Photo: AP).

Picture 2 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction

Picture 2 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction


The giant Mekong catfish is also a species that once "thrived" in Thailand and Cambodia, but the number of these species is getting smaller and smaller, and it is rare for fishermen to catch individuals. Weighing more than 100 kg, this has often happened before.(Photo: AP).

Picture 3 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction

Picture 3 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction


Cambodian fishermen next to a giant Siamese carp caught in Tonle Sap in 2005, just like giant catfish, large Siamese carp are increasingly rare on storage. Mekong area.(Photo: AP).

Picture 4 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction

Picture 4 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction


The giant Chinese thunderstorm can reach 1.5 meters in length, is one of only two giant thunderstorms in the world alongside giant Japanese thunderstorms.However, unlike in Japan, the number of these species in China is seriously threatened by overexploitation, based on the unfounded belief that nutritious meat can treat some diseases.(Photo: Zoological Society of London).

Picture 5 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction

Picture 5 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction


The long snout crocodile (alligator gar) is one of the largest freshwater fish species in North America, living in the Mississippi River area and can reach a length of 2 meters.The number of these species has declined dramatically due to pollution and overfishing to make caviar (caviar).(Photo: AP).

Picture 6 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction

Picture 6 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction


Yangtze river dolphins are thought to be extinct in the wild, the last time they were discovered in 2016. Pollution, overloading waterway traffic and the huge Three Gorges Dam are thought to be the causes. leading to the decline of this species.(Photo: National Geographic).

Picture 7 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction

Picture 7 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction


Mekong dolphins (dugongs) are also endangered animals, currently only less than 100 individuals in the Mekong region, which flows through Cambodia.(Photo: WWF).

Picture 8 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction

Picture 8 of Hydroelectric dams change the flow, the 'water monster' Mekong is on the verge of extinction


According to statistics, the giant soft-shell turtle has only 3 individuals worldwide, including 2 in China and 1 in Dong Mo lake in Vietnam.This animal can live up to 100 years old and weigh more than 100kg.(Photo: China Daily).