India turned into a pan of fire under the hot sun above 50 degrees Celsius

India turned into a pan of fire under the hot sun above 50 degrees Celsius : Many Indian cities reached record high temperatures from 48 to 50.3 degrees Celsius due to the effects of global warming and the late rainy season.

Many Indian cities reached record high temperatures from 48 to 50.3 degrees Celsius due to the effects of global warming and the late rainy season.

Indians are suffering from heat waves with unprecedented high temperatures in the past few days. New Delhi, India's capital of 26 million, experienced the highest temperature of all time, at 48ºC on June 10. The record of the previous temperature of New Delhi was 47.8 ºC on June 9, 2014.

Picture 1 of India turned into a pan of fire under the hot sun above 50 degrees Celsius

Picture 1 of India turned into a pan of fire under the hot sun above 50 degrees Celsius


Central India is most affected by the heat.(Photo: IFL Science).

The record temperature is announced by the Indian Meteorological Administration (IMD) based on Palam observatory records. Safdarjung, another city observatory, noted the temperature of 45.6ºC, the heat can still be lethal because most Indians do not have air conditioning yet.

Other areas in India are even influenced by higher temperatures. On June 1, Churu city in the western state of Rajasthan had a temperature of 50.3ºC. This temperature is only 0.2ºC less than the highest temperature record of all time in India in 2016.

Not only due to global warming , the heat wave is also the result of the late rainy season . At this time of the year, southern and central India often pick up monsoon winds with moisture, but this year is different. The rainy season is late, causing an unusually long heat wave. Rainfall is below average for nearly two decades and dry water supplies prevent many villages from having enough drinking water and water for cattle. Rainfall this year is also expected to be low.

Some Indian cities, led by Ahmedabad, are developing a plan to deal with the heat, including alerting, changing working hours, adjusting infrastructure to reduce heat absorption. An assessment of the effectiveness of Ahmedabad's action plan helps save more than 1,000 lives every year in a small city of 1/3 New Delhi.

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