Making a liquid first aid bandage, the 'little scientist' won a $ 25,000 prize

This liquid first aid bandage was invented by 14-year-old American Kara Fan, which helps to reduce the risk of getting the virus from an overdose of antibiotics.

This liquid first aid bandage was invented by 14-year-old American Kara Fan, which helps to reduce the risk of getting the virus from an overdose of antibiotics.

Kara Fan made a breakthrough after conducting many experiments on metals, including nano-level silver, with a ratio as small as 1 / 80,000 hairs.

Her final product has been shown to kill hundreds of bacteria and create a membrane that functions as a first aid bandage.

Picture 1 of Making a liquid first aid bandage, the 'little scientist' won a $ 25,000 prize
Kara Fan introduces his invention.

Statistics show that every year, an estimated 700,000 people worldwide die from being resistant to antibiotics.

The original inspiration for this invention of Kara Fan is her sister. Accordingly, Fan's grandmother suffered from a urinary tract infection and was saved by antibiotics. This has made me more interested in this field and started tinkering with experiments.

'After paying more attention to antibiotics, I did more research on that topic. I found a website that says that metals - including many different metals - can kill bacteria. Then I decided to experiment, first using copper to kill bacteria, and after many trials, I realized that silver was more effective. And that's how I got involved in this project, '' Fan told Reuters.

Picture 2 of Making a liquid first aid bandage, the 'little scientist' won a $ 25,000 prize
Each year an estimated 700,000 people worldwide die from resistance to antiviral drugs.

With initial advantages, Fan decided to test the biosynthesis method, which is to create complex particles from inside living cells. Seeking to create nano-scale silver solution, the young girl also discovered how to use lemon leaves and silver nitrate to effectively destroy and prevent the growth of bacteria.

'The nanoparticles then kill the bacteria by encircling it and penetrating the cell wall,' she adds.

Successfully destroying bacteria without using antibiotics is a big success.

Picture 3 of Making a liquid first aid bandage, the 'little scientist' won a $ 25,000 prize
Kara Fan has been awarded the $ 25,000 prize and was awarded the title of Leading Young Scientist in the United States.

In fact, overuse of antibiotics can cause illness, death and environmental and commercial impacts, according to a report last year by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization FAO, World Animal Health Organization. gender and World Health Organization WHO.

With the invention of a liquid first aid bandage, Kara Fan was awarded the $ 25,000 prize and was awarded the title of America's Leading Young Scientist.