Opening the 1,000-year-old coffin, containing the missionary remains from the 11th century

Archaeologists unearthed a 1,000-year-old coffin in Mainz, Germany, which contained traces of decomposed bodies of a man who was thought to be the archbishop from the 11th century.

Archaeologists unearthed a 1,000-year-old coffin in Mainz, Germany, which contained traces of decomposed bodies of a man who was thought to be the archbishop from the 11th century.

In 2017, when excavating monuments in St. Church Johannis , one of the city's oldest churches, scientists discovered a corner of a stone casket container beneath the church floor, according to CNN.

After months of preparing and excavating each layer of a sarcophagus, on June 4, a group of 14 archaeologists opened a stone lid weighing 700kg using a pulley system and could look inside for the first time.

"A long preparation time and then the lid is open. It was an impressive moment. We quickly discovered many pieces of debris in the sarcophagus," Guido Faccani, the main archaeologist of project, said.

Picture 1 of Opening the 1,000-year-old coffin, containing the missionary remains from the 11th century

Picture 1 of Opening the 1,000-year-old coffin, containing the missionary remains from the 11th century


The old sarcophagus is opened by the pulley system.(Photo: AP).

At the press conference, Mainz chief monk Andreas Klodt, said everyone in the church "had a little bit of the same feeling as in Indiana Jones", the film is about an archaeologist's adventure. learn the same name.

However, the bones of the people in the club were completely decayed."Cannot find teeth. Dead people may have been dumped alive at the time of burial to speed up the decay process , " said Faccani.

Fabric samples in the cup are sent to the analyst for dating. Traces of bone and tissue will also undergo the same process along with DNA testing.

Experts believe that the remains discovered in the mansion belong to a cleric, because this person is buried in a central position in the middle of the church, facing the altar.

Picture 2 of Opening the 1,000-year-old coffin, containing the missionary remains from the 11th century

Picture 2 of Opening the 1,000-year-old coffin, containing the missionary remains from the 11th century


Fabric samples in the cup are sent to the analyst for dating.(Photo: AP).

This remains may be of Erkanbald, the archbishop of Mainz from 1011 until his death in 1021. "It is likely that he is," said Faccani.

Scientists are expected to investigate the sarcophagus for another two weeks, but have not determined the end time of the project.

Birgit Pfeiffer, Mainz's President of the Catholic monastery, described the opening as very interesting: "We are speechless, fascinated by the opening process. Now the big challenge is for us. is to handle artifacts in the coffin and find ways for the public to access this artifact. "