Spiders are getting more aggressive because of climate change

Climate change not only makes life difficult for humans but also affects the nature of spiders.

Climate change not only makes life difficult for humans but also affects the nature of spiders.

According to Science Alert, research by scientists at McMaster University (Canada) shows that spiders are becoming more aggressive because of the negative changes of the Earth's climate.

Our planet is getting hotter. This increases the frequency and intensity of tropical storms. Scientists predict extreme weather events - called "black swans" - will continue to increase in the near future.

In inclement weather, the more fierce spiders are able to survive, then pass on this trait to the next generation.

"It is extremely important to understand the impact of 'black swans' weather on natural evolution and selection," biologist Jonathan Pruitt of McMaster University wrote in Nature Research.

Picture 1 of Spiders are getting more aggressive because of climate change

Picture 1 of Spiders are getting more aggressive because of climate change


Spiders tend to be more aggressive to adapt to climate change.(Photo: iNaturalist).

"As sea levels rise, the frequency of tropical storms also increases. We face the impact of these storms on the ecosystem and the evolution of animals."

Scientists have conducted research on spider Anelosimus studiosus . They are present throughout the United States and are frequently affected by tropical storms that occur from May to November each year in the country.

Normally, hundreds of Anelosimus studiosus individuals live in colonies in areas along rivers and lakes. However, they are not always happy with this small community.

There are two obvious behavioral trends, some are quite pleasant while others are more aggressive. A swarm of spiders are fierce, they are more aggressive.

The ferocious spiders react more quickly to enemies and prey, and tend to attack, eat gentle meats. They have the ability to survive and overcome the incident better then proceed to "invade" the surrounding areas.

"The aggressive nature of Anelosimus studiosus is inherited from parents to offspring, becoming a key factor to help them survive, adapt to natural environmental conditions and new places," the authors assert. . "More broadly, spider aggression is related to habitat, as well as response to tropical storms."

To determine the impact of storms, scientists gather spiders in areas where storms are projected. After 48 hours from the storm, they returned to sampling for the second time. In three major storms in 2018, the team observed 240 spiders of Anelosimus studiosus. Results showed that surviving spiders tend to be more aggressive.

Explaining this, scientists believe that the lack of food after the storm is the main cause. In order to survive in difficult conditions, the spiders need fierce individuals to defend their territory well against the invaders. Over time, more and more individuals like these exist, grow better.

In addition, the busy spiders are searching for food and protecting the territory, so their children must also develop their survival skills.

This study was completed in collaboration between genetic biologist of McMaster University (Canada), University of California (USA) and published in Nature Research No. 8/2019.

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