The mystery of where plants are buried for hundreds of years can still be revived

The mystery of where plants are buried for hundreds of years can still be revived : British scientists are planning to revitalize buried aquatic species for more than a century.

British scientists are planning to revitalize buried aquatic species for more than a century. These aquatic species live in 'ghost ponds' - ponds that still have water but are buried by rocks and plants.

According to the researchers, restoring some 'ghost ponds' can be a way to restore habitat and biodiversity, we can even revive some extinct plant species. .

Picture 1 of The mystery of where plants are buried for hundreds of years can still be revived

Picture 1 of The mystery of where plants are buried for hundreds of years can still be revived


Aquatic plants can be regenerated after many years of being buried - (photo: Unsplash).

Project lead researcher Emily Alderton said: " We have conducted research and found that aquatic plants in centuries-old bogs can be resurrected from seeds. Preserving in that particular way, ghost ponds are often created because farmers use plants and soil to fill small ponds to expand and reorganize fields.

It is estimated that there could be about 600,000 "ghost ponds" throughout rural England, but so far, the research team from University College London has only dug three ponds.

The researchers used the Ordnance Survey Map (Ordnance Survey) and historical documents as well as observed signs to identify and conduct these "ghost ponds" .

These 3 locations are believed to have been buried in 40, 50, and 150 years. 8 different plant species were collected and scientists only took 6 months to successfully regenerate these 8 species in the laboratory. Eggs from 2 crustaceans were also found, but researchers have yet to assess their status.

Picture 2 of The mystery of where plants are buried for hundreds of years can still be revived

Picture 2 of The mystery of where plants are buried for hundreds of years can still be revived


One of the ghost ponds was excavated - (Photo: UCL).

One of the study participants - Carl Sayer, said: "UK ponds usually have 6 to 14 aquatic plants, of which 8 survive after the pond is filled in. This is really a significant proportion '.

Although not participating in the study, Dr. Christopher Hassall, from the University of Leeds (UK), welcomed the colleagues' findings. According to Hassall, this study is very attractive because it not only finds new ways to overcome the human damage caused to the environment, but also shows the possibility of revival of some species in the the past.

"The ponds are often overlooked because of their small size, but now, they have become worthwhile because of the number of species they nourish and preserve," Hassall said.