The reaction of the body in a weightless environment suggests that living on Mars is still far away!

Read now to know that living on Mars will probably take a long time.

Read now to know that living on Mars will probably take a long time.

According to NASA's latest commitment, they will begin the campaign to bring people to Mars in the 2030s.

And if the announcement is true, it also means that astronauts will have to live in a zero gravity environment for three years - far exceeding the 438-day record of the Russian astronaut Valery. Polyakov.

The question of how our body will change when there is a change in the gravity of the environment? Let's find out together.

1. The brain: Bulging to see

"Bulging head" (or Charlie Brown effect) is a very common state for astronauts while in a zero gravity environment.

Picture 1 of The reaction of the body in a weightless environment suggests that living on Mars is still far away!

Picture 1 of The reaction of the body in a weightless environment suggests that living on Mars is still far away!


Astronaut's brain before and after taking part in short-term travel.

The fluid (including blood and cerebrospinal fluid) from other organs on the skull due to gravity changes will make our faces swell, while the limbs shrink.

According to experts, nitric oxide in the body will cause the blood vessels to expand excessively. This results in an increase in blood flow to the brain, causing excessive pressure on the blood-brain barrier. The result is an edema (oedema) that occurs in the brain.

This is also the " culprit" that causes symptoms of blurred vision, headaches and nausea when the cranial pressure increases due to a significant amount of fluid.

On the other hand, in a vision survey at 27 NASA astronauts - who had an average of 108 days on the ISS space station - the majority had eye problems.

MRI results (magnetic resonance imaging) showed that 9 astronauts showed signs of enlarged optic nerve in the skull.

In addition, there are 6 people whose eyeballs are flattened at the back, which affect their vision somewhat, but still have no answer.

2. Muscle bones: Increased size, reduced density

Picture 2 of The reaction of the body in a weightless environment suggests that living on Mars is still far away!

Picture 2 of The reaction of the body in a weightless environment suggests that living on Mars is still far away!


The astronauts' height can be increased by about 3% while in space.

According to scientists at NASA, the astronauts' height can be increased by about 3% while in space.

At the weightless environment, the disc (spinal dics) between the human vertebrae are stretched out. Therefore, astronauts will become taller than on the ground. Unfortunately, this "high" state is only temporary. A few months after returning to the ground, everything will return to normal.

In contrast to the expansion of the intervertebral discs, astronauts' bone density in the gravityless state is reduced by about 1% per month. This makes the possibility of fracture fracture higher if there is impact.

That's not to mention that muscles are also in a "relaxed" state , not as powerful as on Earth. As a result, astronauts may become atrophy if not exercising regularly during the journey.

3. Immune system: less resistant

Picture 3 of The reaction of the body in a weightless environment suggests that living on Mars is still far away!

Picture 3 of The reaction of the body in a weightless environment suggests that living on Mars is still far away!


Living outside of space can negatively affect the body's immune system.

In a study published in Liebertpub in 2014, scientists say living outside space can negatively affect the body's immune system.

"Factors such as radioactivity, bacteria, stress, disturbed sleep cycles and separation affect the astronaut's immune system in space" - Brian Crucian, an immunologist who studies at home NASA's biological study said.

"If this condition persists over time, the risk of infection, increased sensitivity or problems with autoimmune is possible."

This study also showed that latent viruses (such as chickenpox virus) are more likely to cause disease in the body, when in outer space.