Today's whales migrate with the same path their ancestors lived 270,000 years ago!

The current whale is still migrating with its ancestral-like route that lived 270,000 years ago.

The current whale is still migrating with its ancestral-like route that lived 270,000 years ago. This finding is due to the fossil studies of the Ha - prehistoric GPS!

Berkeley scientist from the University of California when studying the fossil of the Ha - the living creature clinging to the whale's skin, discovered that many whales like Humpback whales and Gray whales still migrating throughout the ocean with the same path as their ancestors lived more than 270,000 years ago.

Picture 1 of Today's whales migrate with the same path their ancestors lived 270,000 years ago!
Whales migrate along the same path as their ancestors lived more than 270,000 years ago.

In order to understand why Berkeley scientists can make this conclusion only from the study of the Ha fossil fossil , we first need to understand the habitat of this animal.

Son Ha is a member of the Joint Foot and Legs industry, they are about the size of a coin, the body is surrounded by a hard shell. This animal has a habit of clinging to a certain surface and living the rest of its life. Once they have found shelter, they will use hairy legs to catch microscopic creatures in the water.

Picture 2 of Today's whales migrate with the same path their ancestors lived 270,000 years ago!
Son Ha is a member of the Foot Joint, which is about the size of a coin.

Beside the underground cliffs and hulls, whale body is a favorite place of Ha Hai. When living on the whale's skin, Ha will travel with this giant and grow up together. As noted, one Ha will increase by a few millimeters per month, by accumulating Calcium Cabonat from seawater into its shell.

Thanks to this mechanism, Son Ha is considered a living indicator of the ocean's environmental conditions. In other words, Ha can record details of the sea area, where whales go through and this information will be preserved even after they die, or even become fossils.

Picture 3 of Today's whales migrate with the same path their ancestors lived 270,000 years ago!
One of the Ha fossils is used for this study.

It was thanks to the study of the fossils of the old Hens who lived on the ancestors of this modern Whale, that Berkeley decoded the route of host fishes from the warm waters of the South Pacific ( mating area) to cold waters in Alaska and the Arctic Ocean (feeding area).

It is known that these precious findings will help scientists understand how the migration route affects whale evolution in the past 3-5 million years. In addition, the way the whale's ancestors adapt to climate change also helps us predict how modern whales will respond to the dizzying changes of today's environment.