O RLY, OED? Internet slang added to Oxford online dictionary

If you're butthurt that the English language gets pwned every time some rando at Oxford University Press adds words to the dictionary, I'm here to tell you, bruh, it's NBD, mkay? 

If you've spent any time conversing online in the past decade, that sentence will make at least some sense to you.

And if it doesn't, you can now look up any of those unfamiliar words, thanks to an update adding more than 1,000 words to OxfordDictionaries.com. 

The free online dictionary of current English usage issued its quarterly update Thursday of new words that have gained widespread currency in the language. 

The list of new words now defined by the website includes many terms and abbreviations used in internet conversations. 

The definitions of the words used in the above sentence are: 

Other new words you may have encountered online include: 

Other words in the update to OxfordDictionaries.com were coined in the media to describe events in the news, such as: 

Angus Stevenson of Oxford Dictionaries said the research methods include monitoring the English language as it's used in a wide variety of sources, including literary novels, newspapers and magazines, as well as blogs, emails and social media. 

"New words, senses, and phrases are added to OxfordDictionaries.com when we have gathered enough independent evidence from a wide range of sources to be sure that they have widespread currency in the English language," he said in a statement.

"This quarter's update shows that contemporary culture continues to have an undeniable and fascinating impact on the language," said Stevenson. 

photo O RLY, OED? Internet slang added to Oxford online dictionary images

photo of O RLY, OED? Internet slang added to Oxford online dictionary

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