Why do people live longer than monkeys?

Humans have twice the lifespan of primates like chimpanzees and monkeys ... Meat may be the reason for the differences in genetic structure that explain why people live longer than them.

Humans have twice the lifespan of primates like chimpanzees and monkeys . Meat may be the reason for the differences in genetic structure that explain why people live longer than them.

Picture 1 of Why do people live longer than monkeys?

Picture 1 of Why do people live longer than monkeys?

Chimpanzees and humanoid gibbons about gene structure are similar to humans, and their human-like gestures refer to the closeness between our three species. Scientists are still confused with the question of why do they not live as long as humans? The diet revolution will be able to explain this question.

Genetic modification seems to allow humans to live longer than primates may be due to a more meaty diet.

These changes may also motivate the brain to grow and help us be less likely to be affected by aging diseases such as cancer, heart disease or dementia.

Chimpanzees and large apes are genetically similar to us, but they rarely live beyond 50 years of age. Although people's life expectancy has doubled in the past 200 years, mainly due to a significant reduction in child mortality due to special advances in nutrition, living environment and medicine - but Even without those advances, people with hunter-gatherer lifestyles have high mortality rates that still have an average life expectancy of twice that of chimpanzees.

The key differences in this life cycle may be due to the genetic structure that humans have modified to better adapt to a meat-rich diet, according to predictions by biologist Caleb Finch, Southern California University, Los. Angeles (USA).

The oldest stone tools discovered by modern human ancestors, originating 2.6 million years ago seem to have been used to chop animal bones, when our ancestors evolved, they Eating and digesting meat, higher nutritional value food by increasing brain size, body shape and reducing intestinal size.

Then eat red meat, especially raw meat with un-cooked parasitic germs, causing chronic inflammation. Therefore, humans seem to have evolved distinct variants of the cholesterol transporter gene, apolipoprotein E, which regulates chronic inflammation, as well as other age-related disorders in the brain and arteries.

Another variation found in modern humans is the ApoE3, which appeared 250,000 years ago, just before the final stage in the evolutionary cycle of Homo sapiens in Africa.

ApoE3 greatly reduces the risk of aging, namely heart disease and Alzheimer's, and is considered to be associated with an increased life expectancy.

Biologist Caleb Finch said: 'I think reducing the risk of aging diseases because they have a diet high in fat, and another benefit is to promote brain development. . '

Strangely, another ancient variant containing apolipoprotein E was found to be less than ApoE4, related to higher levels of cholesterol, reduced life expectancy, and degeneration of blood vessels and brain.

The puzzling thing is, if the ApoE4 is so harmful, why does it exist? 'It may have some protective effect in some cases. There are some data that show that if you have hepatitis C, your life will be less threatened with this variant. '

Suggestions : biology, gene, genetic modification, carnivorous, primate, human, longevity, ApoE3