Why does Lenin's corpse look more and more fresh?

This is the affirmation of Lenin mummified workers. They developed experimental techniques to maintain the spirit for the corpse of the communist revolutionary leader.

Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (1870-1924) died about 90 years, but his body looked fresher and rosier than the day he died.

Lenin's corpse looked more and more fresh

This is the affirmation of Lenin mummified workers. They developed experimental techniques to maintain the spirit for the corpse of the communist revolutionary leader.

They say the technique is the result of nearly a century of research and refining, which has created a scientific method that benefits medical applications.

Picture 1 of Why does Lenin's corpse look more and more fresh?

Picture 1 of Why does Lenin's corpse look more and more fresh?


Vladimir Lenin may have lost 90 years, but his body looked fresher and rosier than the day he died.This is a picture of his body in 1997.

For many people, this is scary, terrible work. But that is the responsibility of a group called "The Tomb of the Tomb ", which at the peak of the period, there were 200 scientists working in the laboratory.

According to Jeremy Hsu's detailed report at the American Academy of Sciences, Russians prefer to preserve the body's shape, weight, color and versatility, rather than preserving biological tissues.

"They have to replace parts like leather, plastic meat and other materials regularly , " said Alexei Yurchak, professor of social anthropology at the University of California. "This is different from embalming."

Picture 2 of Why does Lenin's corpse look more and more fresh?

Picture 2 of Why does Lenin's corpse look more and more fresh?


Vladimir Ilyich Lenin's corpse was embalmed according to Stalin's policy when he died at the age of 53 in 1924 and was kept in Moscow, except for a period during World War II.

Lenin's body was crowned in Moscow's Red Square mausoleum more than two decades after the former Soviet Union disintegrated.

This year Russian officials closed the Red Square, but the public also visited him during Lenin's 145th anniversary (April 22), which took place yesterday (April 23, Vietnamese time). Male).

Yurchak said scientists often use a mild detergent to treat mold spots that appear occasionally on Lenin's face . The mold stain that appeared on Lenin's cheek had caused the embalming scientists to be very worried when they could not erase them.

Each week, they researched and examined Lenin's skin, using devices to measure moisture, color and contour to see if there were signs of dehydration. Every two years, Lenin's body is immersed in a bath containing glycerol and potassium acetate for 30 days - a technique that scientists say can help the body survive for centuries.

Picture 3 of Why does Lenin's corpse look more and more fresh?

Picture 3 of Why does Lenin's corpse look more and more fresh?


Lenin successfully led the Russian revolution in 1917. This is a photograph of him in 1918, 6 years before his death.

While Lenin's blood, body fluids and internal organs were removed, his eyebrows, mustache and beard remained . In addition, a material made of paraffin, glycerin and carotene has been used to replace most of Lenin's skin.

Some of these mummification techniques have been put into medical applications. For example, the technique helps keep blood flowing through the kidneys in a transplant.

Picture 4 of Why does Lenin's corpse look more and more fresh?

Picture 4 of Why does Lenin's corpse look more and more fresh?


Russia's Red Square

In 2012, Russia made a historic decision to bury the embalmed body of the Soviet leader. However, Putin repeatedly postponed the decision to bury Lenin, and argued that Lenin was still a symbol in the hearts of many older Russians .

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