Wild geese change direction to cope with climate change

A recent international study found that the Barnacle wild geese are changing and selecting new places to find food to cope with global climate change.

A recent international study found that the Barnacle wild geese are changing and selecting new places to find food to cope with global climate change.

Accordingly, these birds are flying further north in the Arctic. This is one of the first studies to provide concrete evidence that wildlife is looking for new ways to deal with changing habitats.

Picture 1 of Wild geese change direction to cope with climate change

Picture 1 of Wild geese change direction to cope with climate change


The geese flocked to find a new breeding ground - (Image: GETTY IMAGES)

After 45 years of observation, a team of Scottish researchers from St Andrew University and colleagues from Norway, the Netherlands and the UK found that wild birds, traditionally choosing to gather together to find food just south of the Arctic Circle in Norway, now mainly chooses to fly to the north of Norway, which goes far beyond the Arctic Circle.

According to the findings, the change to the new flight route has been communicated and learned by the geese.

Dr Thomas Oudman, of the Department of Biology at St Andrew University, said: "It makes sense that the birds have flown further north, because at that time there would usually be snow when they arrived in Norway. "But what surprised us was that the young geese also learned to change, a trend that they must have never experienced before age."

In contrast to most other migratory birds, the Barnacle wild geese thrive even when their natural habitats are changing rapidly. They can adapt to climate change due to the availability of alternative places with enough food at the right time and without the threat of humans or other dangerous animals.

Whereas, animals with less social interaction or less discovery will be able to spend more time exploring such places.