The Japanese make lamps from water bottles and smartphones in the super storm Hagibis

Using only milk, water bottles and smartphones, the Japanese man created a survival lamp to help him create a light source during a power outage due to Super Typhoon Hagibis.

Using only milk, water bottles and smartphones, the Japanese man created a survival lamp to help him create a light source during a power outage due to Super Typhoon Hagibis.

As has been reported by the media for a few days now, Japan suffers from typhoon Hagibis on October 12. This is the largest super typhoon in 60 years that the land of the rising sun faces.

Last month, Japan was also affected by another typhoon, leaving millions of people out of power. At this hurricane, Hagibis, many people are prepared for a major outage.

Faced with this risk, the Japanese man posted a post on Twitter instructing people to make survival lamps with smartphone flashes, water bottles and milk.

This guy tried to put the water bottle on top of the flash, but the poor scattering caused the light to produce insignificantly. He then tried adding a bit of milk to create a milky white liquid, creating a light like below.

Picture 1 of The Japanese make lamps from water bottles and smartphones in the super storm Hagibis
The survival lamp generates enough light to sustain operations during a power outage.(Photo: Twitter).

This phenomenon is explained by the effect called Tyndall: when light passes through a liquid solution made up of many different substances, the rays will be reflected at a different angle by different particles in the liquid. There, create a phenomenon of scattering. Therefore, the solution created by milk and water helps create a stronger light source than just milk or water.

Picture 2 of The Japanese make lamps from water bottles and smartphones in the super storm Hagibis
Tyndall effect: solutions created by different mixture of substances will have better light scattering.Besides, turbidity also affects the brightness.(Photo: ThoughCo).

This practice has been known and used widely in many places. The Japanese guy's tweet received tens of thousands of likes and retweets. When faced with emergencies, inventions that are as applicable and easy as this survival lamp are especially useful.

Japan is a country often affected by typhoons, its people and government have a lot of experience and plans to deal with similar disasters. Before Hagibis day, smartphones of the people of this country "fluttered continuously" because of storm notification messages.