Discover Qatar's unique World Heritage

A remnant of a Gulf port town in the 18th century, Al Zubarah Archaeological Site is the only place of Qatar recognized as a World Heritage Site.

According to UNESCO documents, the town of Al Zubarah was founded by merchants from Kuwai, who once flourished as a pearl trading center in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

At its peak, this town was inhabited by about 6,000 to 9,000 people. This is an important maritime trade hub in the Indian, Arab and Western Asia regions.

Picture 1 of Discover Qatar's unique World Heritage
This is an important maritime trade hub in the Indian, Arab and Western Asia regions.

In 1811, the town was severely destroyed and abandoned completely by the Egyptians in the following decades. Over time, much of this monument was covered by a layer of sand blown from the desert. This helps protect the remaining buildings such as houses, harbors, palaces, cathedrals .

In the 20th century, a small part of the site was unearthed, revealing evidence of a thriving metropolitan city based on pearl hunting and trade. Excavation results show that Al Zubarah is planned in a way that many streets run perpendicular to each other and some residential areas are built on a tight network.

Picture 2 of Discover Qatar's unique World Heritage
Al Zubarah is one of the best preserved Gulf port towns of the 18th century.

The town was once protected by a large city wall surrounding a 2.5km arc, protected by 22 semicircular towers arranged along the walls. Not far from town is the remnants of Qal'at Murair's fortress and evidence of how the water supply for the desert has been managed and protected.

Researchers say the ancient town of Al Zubarah is one of the best-preserved 18th-century Gulf towns.

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