Huttusa, the capital of the Hittile Empire

Unesco's Scientific, Educational and Cultural Organization has recognized Huttusa, the capital of Turkey's Hittile empire, as a World Cultural Heritage in 1986.

Huttusa is a city in Turkey, today located in the northern capital of Ankarra - the capital of the Hittile empire.
The Hittile Empire once existed and flourished. The proofs of a city that existed and disappeared were only temples, religious cemeteries and relief brick pillars. The Hattusa Empire had a great cultural influence in a large area extending from Anatolia to northern Syria for about 200 years.

Picture 1 of Huttusa, the capital of the Hittile Empire

In the early 20th century, archaeologists found traces of Hittite civilization and from here excavations were carried out. The ruins of Hattusa - the capital of the Hittite Empire were discovered at a site 150 km east of Ankara. Among the relics found, there is a marble plate, engraved with the peace agreement between Heittite and Egypt. This agreement was signed by King Hattusili III and Pharaoh Ramses II in 1285 BC, after the fighting between Kadesh and the two sides. This is the oldest international treaty in human history.

Picture 2 of Huttusa, the capital of the Hittile Empire
Traces of the city of Hattusha - the capital of the Hittile empire in Turkey

To date, about 30,000 stone plates have been engraved with Hittite letters . The decoding of these characters led archaeologists to find a brilliant civilization, with many strange points in rituals and state organizational systems.

The Hittites are an ancient Anatolia (Asia Minor) people, an Anatolian language people, an Indo-European language. They established a central kingdom in Hattusa (Hittite URUḪattuša) in Northern-Central Anatolia, on the Central Anatolia plateau, around the 18th century BC. The Hittite Empire reached its peak around the 14th century BC. Historians say that around 1180 BC, the empire broke down into many independent " New Hittite " cities. Some survived until the 8th century BC.

Picture 3 of Huttusa, the capital of the Hittile Empire

The Hittite kingdom is often called the land of Hatti by Hittites. The exact name is "the land of Hattusa city".

Despite the Bronze Age, the Hittites were the first citizens of the Iron Age . The development of iron production was sought during this period based on archaeological findings dating back to the 14th century BC.

According to historical records, the Hittite kingdom is usually divided into three periods, including: The Ancient Age of the Hittile Kingdom (1750-1500 BC); Central Kingdom of Hittile (1500-1430 BC); the new Kingdom (1430-1180 BC).

The ancient kingdom with the great center of Hattusa reached the golden age around the 16th century BC.

Picture 4 of Huttusa, the capital of the Hittile Empire

Picture 5 of Huttusa, the capital of the Hittile Empire

Picture 6 of Huttusa, the capital of the Hittile Empire
The works that mark the golden age of civilization have disappeared

Earlier, during the 15th century BC, Hittite fell into darkness. It was later restored under Tudhaliya 's reign from about 1400 BC. Under Suppiluliuma I and Mursile II, the empire was expanded to most of Anatolia and part of Syria and Canaan, so by 1300 BC, the empire had been exposed to Egypt's influence, leading to the battle. indiscriminate in Kadesh in 1274 BC.

Civil war and throne competition, combined with external threats weakened Hittite around 1160 BC, the empire collapsed. In the new kingdom, " New Hittile" established a series of small states, under the rule of Assyria, which existed until about 700 BC.

Picture 7 of Huttusa, the capital of the Hittile Empire

Huttusa, the capital of the Hittile empire was recognized by the Unesco as a World Cultural Heritage by criteria (i), (ii), (iii), (iv)

Criterion (i): Huttusa, the capital of the Hittile empire is the place where the imprints of unique artistic achievements remain.

Criterion (ii): Huttusa, the capital of the Hittile empire, has had a great influence on the cultural development of the surrounding areas for a long time.

Criterion (iii): Remains of palaces, temples and cemeteries here are testament to a civilization that has flourished and is now gone.

Criterion (iv): Some architectural works here are still well preserved, architectural marvels from thousands of years ago.

Picture 8 of Huttusa, the capital of the Hittile Empire

Picture 9 of Huttusa, the capital of the Hittile Empire

Although it has spent thousands of years with the influence of time and climate, many buildings and stone statues here are still in good condition and well preserved.

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