Surprising the purpose of the ancients when the soldiers' teeth were killed

The Battle of Waterloo in 1815 was one of the fiercest and bloodiest battles in human history when about 50,000 soldiers died. It is a shocking fact that the ancients used the teeth of soldiers killed to make dentures.

Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte of France had a final battle with the British-led coalition at Waterloo (present-day Belgium) on June 18, 1815.

Accordingly, the battle of Waterloo became the bloodiest battle in history. An estimated 50,000 soldiers died in the historic Battle of Waterloo.

A scary and unbelievable fact is that after the soldiers died on the battlefield, people took the teeth of the dead.

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The ancients took the teeth of soldiers killed to make dentures.

The purpose of the ancients when taking the teeth of soldiers killed in battle is to make dentures. This comes from the situation that porcelain porcelain production at that time was not well developed .

Accordingly, dentists create dentures from real human teeth. Soldiers' teeth were a major source of dentures. The soldiers who died on the battle of Waterloo were mostly of healthy young people. Therefore, the teeth of the soldiers who died were usually in good condition and very suitable for dentures.

After taking teeth from the dead, dentists will conduct disinfection and clean procedures before implanting dentures for customers.

In the 1800s, people wishing to grow dentures did not care much about the origin of the teeth taken from the soldiers who died on the battlefield. Most customers who want to have dentures only care that they can be more confident talking and smiling to people.

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