Discover new human relatives in South Africa

1400 pieces of bone, 140 teeth of a new human species, named Homo Naledi, have been discovered in a cave deep in the ground in Africa.

1400 pieces of bone, 140 teeth of a new human species, named Homo Naledi, have been discovered in a cave deep in the ground in Africa. Scientists believe that this human being lived about 2-3 million years ago, characterized by both primitive and modern humans and other species belonging to the human family. This is an extremely important archaeological discovery, helping us to better understand the genealogical tree as well as the ancient evolutionary process.

Detecting new human fossils, living 2-3 million years ago

Until now, scientists have yet to discover many of the early human fossils. For the past 100 years, archaeological anthropologists have found almost no small fossil remains of human ancestry. However, in a very accidental study, scientists at the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa and National Geographic have discovered a large number of human fossils that have never been known.

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Diagram of cave area containing fossil bones.

The cave area is located deep underground and scientists believe the area was intentionally made to bury the dead. This is something that has never been seen before for fossils dating back to the primitive and possibly, it will greatly affect the understanding of the origin of modern human behavior.

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3D images reconstruct the face of Homo Baledi based on the bones found.

According to Professor Lee Berger at the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa, there are still thousands of fossils still in the cave. However, for scientists, what has just been discovered is an extremely wonderful thing and since then, they have discovered the unique characteristics: this species stands 2 feet high, about 120cm tall, slender, weighs about 45kg, strong, skeletal muscle grows.

Professor Berger said: 'Looking at the pelvis and shoulders, you would think it was the Southern Australopithecus that appeared in Africa 4 million years ago or the ancestor of Homo. But when you look at your feet, you will think this is our species, appearing 200,000 years ago. The skull shows that the brain size of this species is only half that of us and looks like some Homo species that lived 2 million years ago. "

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Hand bones fossils of Homo Naledi species.

The researchers identified this fossil very similar to us although, in comparison, the characteristics of the skull, hands and teeth belong to a species that does not belong to the human body. And so, they decided to name this species Homo naledi. Currently, scientists still haven't pinpointed the age of the skeletons, probably 2-3 million years ago, when Homo first appeared, but probably more recently.

What does this discovery mean? Professor Berger said: 'Do we inherit the characteristics of this species? They have five in the human race or where do they come from? With such brain size, how can they think? and there are many other questions. " Scientists will be eager to conduct research based on these fossils to learn more. However, there are suggestions that the upcoming findings may completely change. our history.

  • The discovery of the ability to exchange genes between ancient humans
  • The discovery of new ancient human fossils from more than 3 million years ago

Add some pictures in the fossil excavation process:

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The group of archaeologists joined the cave.

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A vertical tunnel is the only entrance to the cave.

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A member of the research team is working under the cave.

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The leader of the study, Professor Lee Berger expressed his delight at discovering this time.

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The members of the group are conducting a sample analysis.

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Based on the skull structure, scientists believe that the brain of Homo Naledi is only half of modern humans.

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A jaw bone with full teeth is found.

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The foot bone is said to be similar to our human species 200,000 years ago.

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The right and left skull bones fossilized with 3D technology.