How to learn anything?

Practicing any skill such as performing a dance, playing an instrument or throwing a basketball into a basket requires practice.

Practicing any skill such as performing a dance, playing an instrument or throwing a basketball into a basket requires practice. Practice is repeating an action many times to help make it easier, faster and more confident. So how does training work to make us better and better?

Our brain has two types of nerve tissue: gray matter and white matter . Gray matter processes information in the brain, controls signals and stimulates sensation to nerve cells, while white matter is primarily made up of adipose tissue and nerve fibers. In order for our bodies to move, information needs to be transferred from the brain's gray matter, down to the spinal cord, through a series of nerve fibers called axons to our muscles.

Axon fibers exist in a white substance surrounded by fat called myelin . And that very cover seems to change training. Myelin is like the insulation of an electrical cable. It prevents the waste of energy from the electrical signals that the brain uses, moving them more efficiently along the nerve pathways.

Picture 1 of How to learn anything? Photo 1 of How to learn anything?
Practice is repeating an action many times to help make it easier and easier.

Several studies in mice show that repetition of physical motion increases the myelin sheaths that separate axon fibers. The more the membrane, the greater the distance around the axon strands, creating a superhighway for the information that connects the brain to your muscles. Therefore, the myelin layer of the nerve is a factor that gives them an advantage thanks to the faster and more efficient transmission of nerve signals.

There are many theories about efforts to quantify the number of hours, days, even years of practice to be able to become skilled at certain skills. However, to become good is not simply the number of hours of practice but also the quality and effectiveness of training. Effective training is about being able to focus, being highly focused and always aiming to limit your current abilities. So if effective training is the key, then how can we make the most of the practice time?

Focus on the task at hand by minimizing distractions such as turning off the computer or TV and putting the phone in airplane mode. Laptops, phones, and especially Facebook are the most distracting sources. One study looked at 260 students who did their homework, the focus cycle was about 6 minutes at a time, and then they got distracted into technological devices.

Start slowly and accurately, then repeat and slowly increase the speed. Repeated repetition with high intensity will help train reflexes more effectively. Accompanied by a reasonable allocation of time between effective training and rest time. Studies show that many good athletes, musicians, and dancers spend 50-60 hours a week on their professional activities.

Picture 2 of How to learn anything? Photo 2 of How to learn anything?
Start slowly and accurately, then repeat and slowly increase the speed.

Imagination is also a way of training the brain. Quite surprising, but many studies show that a post-workout movement can continue to be practiced through imagination. In one study, 144 basketball players were divided into two teams. For 2 weeks, Team A practices physically with one-hand throwing, while Team B only thinks of practicing them. When they were tested at the end of the experiment, the average and good players on both teams improved almost equally.

Scientists are getting closer and closer to unraveling the secrets of our brains, which will enable people to master their skills in the quickest possible time. For now, effective training is still the best way to overcome the limits and maximize your potential.