The hot sun caused a forest fire to reveal a mysterious message from World War II

Wicklow County in Ireland has just experienced a massive fire, leaving countless people at risk of losing their homes.

Wicklow County in Ireland has just experienced a massive fire, leaving countless people at risk of losing their homes. However, and probably rarely can say this: this wildfire brings an interesting fact. People discovered a message hidden between the trees, only visible when burned. The message has existed since World War II.

The fire at Bray Head revealed the letters EIRE made of stone, placed along the coast during World War II to signal the bomber that they were flying over neutral territory. In Irish, Éire thought Irish .

Picture 1 of The hot sun caused a forest fire to reveal a mysterious message from World War II Photo 1 of The hot sun caused a forest fire to reveal a mysterious message from World War II
The fire at Bray Head revealed the letters EIRE made of stone.

The Irish Air Force Police Unit discovered a message that could be seen from above when flying across Wicklow territory, to investigate the situation after the fire took place.

And this is not the only "sign" of the EIRE in Ireland. Along the coast, there are many similar areas.

"Signs posted by the Coast Guard Service in the summer of 1944, to warn war planes are not active in a neutral country , " Michael Kennedy from Ireland's Neutral Defense Organization told. Dublin Live. "Up to 150 tons of stone were used to make a total of 83 signs along the Irish coast".

Picture 2 of The hot sun caused a forest fire to reveal a mysterious message from World War II Photo 2 of The hot sun caused a forest fire to reveal a mysterious message from World War II
This "signage" helps American bombers cross the Atlantic Ocean.

Kennedy also added: "The US Air Force has demanded to make these signs, making them a means of positioning for pilots. They have helped American bombers cross the Atlantic."

Although the number of "signposts" is very much, but the Irish Air Defense Police unit calls this an unusual discovery, because there are very few such places "surviving" through World War II. .