This high-tech jacket allows the hearing impaired to 'feel' the music on their skin

Twin sisters Hermon and Heroda Berhane are swaying to the vibrant music at a nightclub in London (UK). For several decades, the twins could not hear any sound when they lost their hearing at an early age. Worth mentioning, both Hermon and her sister Heroda Berhane have an endless passion for dancing, but being unable to listen to music due to hearing loss makes this passion not really complete.

However, a turning point changed the lives of this couple. For the first time in their lives, Hermon and Heroda Berhane felt extremely excited to be able to feel the sounds of music, all thanks to the special coat they were wearing.


This high-tech coat is equipped with this special sensor that allows deaf people to "feel" music on their skin.

It is known that this shirt is called "Sound Shirt" (roughly translated: "sound shirt" , was invented by fashion company CuteCircuit based in London (UK). Usually, the "Sound Shirt" has a very special design, with 16 tactile sensors embedded directly in the smart cloth of the shirt.

With these sensors, live music will be converted into data in real time and transmitted to the wearer. As a result, users can feel the violin on their arms and the drum on their back, bringing a completely new experience.

Picture 1 of This high-tech jacket allows the hearing impaired to 'feel' the music on their skin
Hearing impaired twins Berhane are excited about their special coats.

The Berhane twins, along with several other hearing impaired, said that the invention of this smart shirt model gave them a completely new experience.

" The shirt almost helps us feel the depth of the music," said Hermon excitedly . " It's as if we can move along with it. "

Francesca Rosella, co-founder and creative director of CuteCircuit, which designs fashion products with technology, says the "Sound Shirt" allows deaf and hard-to-hear people to perceive music through feeling. .

Picture 2 of This high-tech jacket allows the hearing impaired to 'feel' the music on their skin
"Sound Shirt" has a very special design, with 16 tactile sensors embedded directly in the smart fabric of the shirt.

According to Reuters, the "Sound Shirt" is not cheap, up to more than 3,000 pounds, equivalent to nearly 85 million. However, according to Heroda, this price is perfectly acceptable when the "Sound Shirt" model has given deaf people like her and her sister the opportunity to enjoy music.

" I think it can definitely change our lives ," she said.

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