Cat's eye jewel formed from ancient dinosaur bones in Australia

The skeleton of a new dinosaur found in Australia has been opalized for a long time and becomes a rare cat eye.

Picture 1 of Cat's eye jewel formed from ancient dinosaur bones in Australia

Picture 1 of Cat's eye jewel formed from ancient dinosaur bones in Australia


Fostoria dhimbangunmal dinosaurs can be up to 5 meters long.(Photo: CNN).

The search for gems in Australia reveals the first fossil evidence of a flock of dinosaurs, including previously undiscovered dinosaurs. The new fossil dinosaur in the opal gem has been transformed into this gemstone after a long time. This is the most complete opal dinosaur skeleton in the world.

Miner Bob Foster was the first to find fossil bones in the 1980s in the Sheepyard opal . He put fossils in a raw wool bag and handed it to the Australian Museum in Sydney. The museum's paleontologists returned to the jewel to help Foster excavate. They found a total of more than 60 fossils.

Fossils were displayed at the museum a few years before Foster brought to the Australian Cat Eye Center. When the children donated the fossil numbers to the center in 2015, scientific research could begin.

Picture 2 of Cat's eye jewel formed from ancient dinosaur bones in Australia

Picture 2 of Cat's eye jewel formed from ancient dinosaur bones in Australia


A piece of fossilized bone fossilized.(Photo: CNN).

Paleontologist Phil Bell in New England, Armidale, found the fossil to a previously unknown dinosaur. But when Bell and his colleagues took a closer look, they identified the bones that belonged to many dinosaurs.

"At first, we thought it was a skeleton, but when I looked at a few bones, I realized we had four different sized shoulder blades. There were about 60 opal bones from a dinosaur. The wall, including a part of the skull, " Bell said.

According to a study published June 3 in the Journal of Paleontology, the new dinosaur is named Fostoria dhimbangunmal , which means "sheepyard" in Yuwaalaraay by native speakers in New South Wales. .

Fostoria is a hindquarters herbivore, which belongs to the same genus as the iguanodon. Parts of the four Fostoria skeletons were found, including the young and adults that could reach nearly 5 meters. This makes researchers believe that this is a dinosaur family or at least a small herd.

Cat's eye jewel can have any color in the visible light area and most of the world's cat eye jewel comes from Australia's mountainous area. This area has suitable geological conditions to make cat's eye shape near the edge of the ancient inland sea. Cat's eye jewel is also the pearl of Australia.

Cat's eye jewel formed in the stone cavity. When a bone is buried under sand or clay and petrified, cat's eye jewel forms a fossilized copy of the bone. Fostoria's skeleton is among the most complete fossils in Australia.

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