Detected ancient stones in the 2,700-year-old Turkish temple

During excavation at a newly discovered temple in southeastern Turkey, the archaeological team led by the University of Toronto obtained stone tablets dating back to the Iron Age between 1200 and 600 years ago. Yuan.

During excavation at a newly discovered temple in southeastern Turkey, the archaeological team led by the University of Toronto obtained stone tablets dating back to the Iron Age between 1200 and 600 years ago. Yuan. Found in the inner part of the temple, these slabs partly reveal the ambition of the Asyrian empire.

The representative collection of New Assyrian civilization appeared in a new Hittie temple, partly to understand the religious influence of the Asyria imperialist ideology, 'Timothy Harrison, the archaeological professor of the Institute. studying Middle Eastern civilizations, University of Toronto Archaeological Project Manager (TAP). ' The stones and its contents can help understand the imperial ambition of one of the most powerful dynasties of the ancient world, as well as the cultural and political influence to this day. in the Middle East. ' The temple's interior also contains gold, bronze and metal utensils, wine jars and elaborate decorated sacrifices.

Picture 1 of Detected ancient stones in the 2,700-year-old Turkish temple

Picture 1 of Detected ancient stones in the 2,700-year-old Turkish temple

Image of a stone tablet ready to be relocated. (Photo: J. Jackson)

Partly explored in 2008 at Tell Tayinat, the ancient capital of the Palestinian Kingdom of the New Hitttite, the temple where the stones were discovered still retains the traditional structure of the same temples. It is located in a sacred worship area, which once has a memorial for Luwian hieroglyphics (an ancient Anatoli typeface used in Turkey) that is now only fragments.

'Tayinat was destroyed by King Asyria Tiglath-pileser III in 738 BC, and then downgraded to a provincial government with available government machinery,' Harrison said.

The temple was later burned in a large fire, leaving only coal-stained bricks and wood. But the burnt materials themselves contribute to protecting the objects discovered this time.

'The person who caused the fire has yet to be determined, but what is discovered in this temple keeps a trace of a critical moment in its history,' says Harrison.

'They show the face of the complex cultural and ethnic struggles of this disturbing land.'

TAP is an international project, involving many scientists from more than 20 research institutes and universities of dozens of countries. The project has close coordination with the Turkish Ministry of Culture, and offers many research and training opportunities for both university students and scientists. The project received funding from the Canadian Humanities and Social Sciences Research Council and also the support from the University of Toronto.

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