Attach 'motor' to the tail of weak sperm to cure infertility

In fact, there have been a number of ways to support solving infertility problems, such as artificial insemination and in vitro fertilization.

By creating a micro-magnetic device that drives magnetically to the tail's sperm, making it easier to swim to the egg to increase fertilization , German researchers have opened up more opportunities to have children for their goods. million couples are faced with infertility - late is quite popular in the world today.

In fact, there have been a number of ways to support solving infertility problems, such as artificial insemination and in vitro fertilization. However, these practices cannot guarantee full success. This time, researchers at the Dresden Institute of Applied Nanoscience have taken a completely new approach that enhances successful fertilization rates by supporting the swimming process for some of the sperm sperms. weighted but weak.

Picture 1 of Attach 'motor' to the tail of weak sperm to cure infertility Photo 1 of Attach 'motor' to the tail of weak sperm to cure infertility
Polymer-metal fibers wrap into the sperm's tail into a spiral, then use magnetic fields to guide the sperm to the egg.

Accordingly, they created "sperm robots" that support weak sperm , accelerating them during swimming to eggs. This study began in 2014 and at that time, their approach was to place the sperm into a tiny titanium and iron film tube, then use magnetic fields to guide the structure to the destination. .

However, sperm is no longer placed in a tube, but instead, they develop a metal-polymer fiber wrapped in a spermic tail into a spiral , which is then used to guide the crystal. coincides with eggs. "We have chosen a spiral structure to make micro-motor drive because it allows us to control the direction of sperm movement easily with only Helmholtz coils (2 loops)," the team said. strings create magnetic fields evenly) ".

In one experiment, the team captured a living sperm, inserted a wire structure from the spiral into its tail and placed it on a petri dish, then used a rotating magnetic field to bring it to the egg. After reaching the destination, the wire loop will be removed as well as the magnetic field and it can fertilize normally like any other sperm. Although this approach is very promising, the team thinks that more tests need to be done before going further. Hopefully this approach will soon succeed in clinical trials, opening up new prospects for miserable couples about infertility today.