Battery with electricity is obsolete, these 'wriggling' robots can operate with mechanical moisture

Researchers at Seoul National University in Korea have successfully built the robot

Forget about battery-powered or electric robots, they're obsolete! The robot of the future can be operated by mechanical moisture.

Researchers at Seoul National University in Korea have successfully built the robot "buckling forward" by absorbing moisture from the surrounding environment. The hygrobot (this combination of hygro - wet and robot) is capable of crawling, crawling and buckling like a snake. In the future, they will be used for many different purposes, including transporting drugs under human skin.

Picture 1 of Battery with electricity is obsolete, these 'wriggling' robots can operate with mechanical moisture Photo 1 of Battery with electricity is obsolete, these 'wriggling' robots can operate with mechanical moisture
These robots are capable of changing shape and size by absorbing water in the soil or air.

The idea for these beautiful little robots comes from many plants that can change shape and size by absorbing water in the soil or air. For example, pine nuts will curl up when it rains, then bloom again when the sky is dry. In the past, plants were 'inspiring' for scientists: last year, the study of materials materials at the University of Hong Kong invented a robot made of algae.

Hygrobot is not made from plants, they only simulate the mechanism of the organism's activity. This is a huge breakthrough, because the moisture - the main energy of these robots, comes entirely from nature. Unlike batteries, it is not only non-toxic, it does not cause explosion or danger to owners and people around.

Picture 2 of Battery with electricity is obsolete, these 'wriggling' robots can operate with mechanical moisture Photo 2 of Battery with electricity is obsolete, these 'wriggling' robots can operate with mechanical moisture
Hygrobot is not made from plants, they only simulate the mechanism of the organism's activity.

Hygrobot is made up of 2 layers of nanofibers: one layer absorbs moisture and one layer does not. When placed on a wet surface, the dehumidifier will bulge, pushing the robot up from the surface. Once it is dry, hygrobot buckles down and the cycle continues, allowing it to move.


Hygrobot.

To prove its potential, the scientists put the hygrobot in a cultured petri dish filled with bacteria, and when it crawled over, leaving a sterile streak - similar to a snail saved. Sugar mucus during migration. In the future, these robots will use the moisture on our skin as a means of transportation. They can also be equipped with sensors to respond to gases other than steam.