Mexico studied 30 sets of ancient remains

Newly discovered 2,000-year-old remains in Mexico can provide links with the first settlers in the Americas.

Newly discovered 2,000-year-old remains in Mexico can provide links with the first settlers in the Americas.

A total of 30 sets of remains have been found inside the 'La Sepultura' cave in Tamaulipas state, Mexico. They are being studied by genetic experts to determine whether this group is related to the first groups of people coming to the Americas.

Picture 1 of Mexico studied 30 sets of ancient remains Photo 1 of Mexico studied 30 sets of ancient remains
The remains in the cave "La Sepultura" - (Photo: AFP)

The results of carbon isotope analysis and ancient DNA studies will indicate that this is the "home" of one of the continent's oldest genetic lines, involving those who crossed Bering's waist about 10,000 years ago. year or not.

Scientists at the Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) and Cordoba University (Spain) are examining these remains, according to NBC News.

INAH expert Jesus Ernesto Gonzalez Velasco said that DNA research and carbon isotope analysis and human skull morphology will allow them to understand the cultural habits of the pickers and gatherers of that time.

Previous studies have found mummy samples near the 'La Escondida' cave, with DNA markers belonging to the first groups of people settled in the Americas.